Bubbly four ways

Mi cava, su cava

It seems only right to break out the bubbly at this time of year. In a few weeks, we won’t be able to enjoy our back porch without first slathering on a bottle of bug spray, lighting 15 citronella candles and hooking up the bug zapper. OK, we may live in the South, but we honestly don’t have one of those.

Since I’m breaking out the bubbly, I’d like to make a toast to ChefMom over at Eat, Play, Love. She recently gave me the Versatile Blogger Award. She’s passed the award onto a number of other worthy bloggers. Her list is here. She got the award from some great bloggers, Kay aka BabyGirl at Pure Complex and Alison at Happy Domesticity. Alison, along with Genn at Cadencies, also gave me the award. Here’s my list. Update! Samina Cooks gave me the award too, her list is here.

Now, onto the bubbly. Here are four ways to enjoy a nice cava or prosecco, something you didn’t spend a fortune on. A nice bottle is always better straight up.

Drizzle a little Chambord or limoncello in the bottom and fill the rest with the bubbly. (Those two are in the center.) On the left is a different spin on a mimosa. Use equal parts grapefruit and orange juice and add desired amount of sparkling wine. Or put some mixed-berry puree in the bottom of your glass. Although, if it’s shaped like ours it may not mix well, not that we make mistakes we rather enjoy trying to slurp puree from such a thin stem. Try a more traditional flute or GASP! a wine glass. No one will think any less of you.

Mixed-berry puree

  • 1 pint strawberries
  • 6 ounces raspberries or blackberries or combination of two
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp Chambord (optional)

Blend berries, sugar and lemon juice in blender until pureed. Place sieve over a bowl and pour mixture through to strain seeds. You’ll need to help it along with a spatula. Once strained, stir in Chambord if desired.

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About Rufus' Food and Spirits Guide

This blog attempts to collect some of the things I try to create with food and booze. Sometimes I succeed and sometimes I fail. My hope is to entertain and maybe help people think a little harder about what they decide to eat and drink.
This entry was posted in Breakfast, Recipes, Spirits and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

33 Responses to Bubbly four ways

  1. um, wow. what a way to do bubbly with style! and that cork-mosaic tray is fab fab fab!

  2. jaclynnchan says:

    Congrats on the award! Those champagne cocktails look amazing and, coincidentally, I am in charge of some type of champagne drink for a bridal shower on Saturday…thanks for the drink help!

  3. boogie. says:

    i love everything about this picture! …i’d love to drink all of it, as well!

  4. As I’m currently in France, I have to add the classic Kir Royale – tablespoon of creme de cassis at the bottom…

    Trust me, I’ve enjoyed a few since we got here!

    I’ll raise a glass to all of your treats tonight!

  5. Yuri says:

    I fell in love with your photo! Want to try all those variations. Yay for strawberries :D

  6. Rita says:

    Super delicious for a summer garden party. ;)

  7. Alison says:

    These all look and sound great! I hope you enjoyed them all! (Thanks for the shout out!)

  8. ChefMom says:

    Aw shucks! Cheers to you as well. ;)

    I love the recipes. I think I’m going to try the limoncello and the mixed berry puree. Hubby is wrapping up some work soon – perhaps we’ll toast to that. :)

    On a side note – did you guys make that serving try with old corks? I’ve been looking for a way to use mine up. Last year we made a trivet and I just lined the edges of a clock with them…still have more though and I like the tray a lot!

  9. saminacooks says:

    Wow, awesome bubbly! I can’t wait to try this!! Thank you for the toast!

  10. randommanda says:

    This looks delicious – and what a beautiful shot you captured!

  11. spicegirlfla says:

    They all look so pretty! Great idea for upcoming Mother’s day! I like your cork tray too!

  12. Ana le Roux says:

    I just love your story telling style and your stunning pictures. Going to try some of your drinks…for sure.

  13. My boyfriend saw this post and now he wants me to make these for him :P
    This picture turned out beautifully and I really like that cork tray!

  14. Love, love, love this! I’m am such a fan of Champaigne/Cava/Prossecco cocktails! Drinks before Noon all around! And Chambord is such deliciousness.

  15. wee eats says:

    I tried these for the first time on New Years for an alternative to champagne at our brunch ~ did a berry puree, peach puree, then just some OJ (mimosas) ~ very tasty! It really is a great versatile drink, plus it’s fun to let everyone make their own drink by adding the fruit of their choice!

  16. I will drink some bubbly now and I don’t drink lol. I loved receiving this award from you so it’s only right you get it back as many times as you can :).

  17. Oh my. I do the same berry puree but with moscato d’asti for even more sweetness.

  18. Ooh–I like the idea of limoncello and sparkling wine. We usually break out the limoncello as it gets hot here–and it’s 90 degrees right now, so it’s time.

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  20. ....RaeDi says:

    I am learning so much about the spirits from your blog, these sound great….RaeDi

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